Extramural Funding Opportunities

NASA Centennial Challenges Program
Deadline: January 24, 2019 

In accordance with the NASA Prize Authority, the NASA Centennial Challenges program has released Phase 1 of the CO₂Conversion Challenge.  Interested teams that wish to compete may now register on the official Challenge site at www.co2conversionchallenge.org.

NASA Centennial Challenges is a program of prize competitions to stimulate innovation in technologies of interest and value to NASA and the nation.  NASA is providing the prize purse, and NASA Centennial Challenges will be managing the Challenge with support from Common Pool.

The CO₂ Conversion Challenge is devoted to fostering the development of CO₂ conversion systems that can effectively produce singular or multiple molecular compounds identified as desired microbial manufacturing ingredients and/or that provide a significant advancement of physicochemical CO₂ conversion for the production of useful molecules.  NASA envisions this competition having two phases with a total prize purse of up to $1 million.  Phase 1 (the current phase) is the Concept Phase with a prize purse of up to $250,000 to demonstrate capabilities to develop technologies to manufacture “food” for microbial bioreactors from CO₂ and hydrogen molecules, with the ultimate goal of producing glucose.   The initiation of Phase 2, a Demonstration Challenge with a prize purse of up to $750,000, is contingent on the emergence of promising submissions in Phase 1 that demonstrate a viable approach to achieve the Challenge goals. The official rules for Phase 2 will be released prior to the opening of Phase 2.

Official documentation related to this Challenge can be found at www.co2conversionchallenge.org.

Interested teams should submit their registration by 5:00pm Central Time on January 24, 2019.  Submissions must be received by 5:00pm Central Time on February 28, 2019.  No further requests for review will be accepted after this date.

L’Oréal USA For Women in Science Fellowship Program
Deadline: February 1, 2019

The L’Oréal USA For Women in Science fellowship program honors female scientists at a critical stage in their careers with grants of $60,000 each. Since 2003, we’ve awarded 75 postdoctoral women scientists nearly $4 million in grants. We’re seeking five exceptional female scientists looking to advance their research and serve as role models for the next generation of girls in STEM.

Candidates are selected from a variety of fields including the life and physical/material sciences, technology (including computer science), engineering, and mathematics. Candidates must have completed their PhD and have started in their postdoctoral position by the application deadline.

Should you have any questions or require additional information, please contact Rachel Pacifico.

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Fellowship
Deadline: February 15, 2019

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is excited to announce that the INL Graduate Fellowship postings are now open. This year there are two INL Graduate Fellowship postings. The first is specific to National and Homeland Security research, the second is associated with other INL mission areas.

The INL Graduate Fellowship program is designed to identify exceptional talent in research areas aligned with INL’s strategic agenda to enable the current and future mission of the INL. The program, a collaboration between INL and universities, provides mentoring and financial support for outstanding students who plan to enroll in graduate degree programs.

Applicants are invited to apply online through inl.gov/careers job posting numbers 12535 and 12584. The postings will close February 15, 2019. Selections will be announced in May. Letters of recommendation can be emailed directly to Ali Josephson.

Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier: Core Research (FW-HTF)
Deadline: March 6, 2019

The Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier (FW-HTF), one of the Big Ideas, is one mechanism by which NSF is responding to the challenges and opportunities for the future of jobs and work. The overarching vision is to support convergent research to understand and develop the human-technology partnership, design new technologies to augment human performance, illuminate the emerging socio-technological landscape, understand the risks and benefits of new technologies, understand and influence the impact of artificial intelligence on workers and work, and foster lifelong and pervasive learning.

The specific objectives of the Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier program are:

  1. to facilitate convergent research that employs the joint perspectives, methods, and knowledge of computer science, engineering, learning sciences, research on education and workforce training, and social, behavioral, and economic sciences;
  2. to encourage the development of a research community dedicated to designing intelligent technologies and work organization and modes inspired by their positive impact on individual workers, the work at hand, the way people learn and adapt to technological change, creative and supportive workplaces (including remote locations, homes, classrooms, or virtual spaces), and benefits for social, economic, and environmental systems at different scales;
  3. to promote deeper basic understanding of the interdependent human-technology partnership to advance societal needs by advancing design of intelligent work technologies that operate in harmony with human workers, including consideration of how adults learn the new skills needed to interact with these technologies in the workplace, and by enabling broad workforce participation, including improving accessibility for those challenged by physical or cognitive impairment; and
  4. to understand, anticipate, and explore ways of mitigating potential risks arising from future work at the human-technology frontier.

A proposal for a research grant in this program must focus on advancing fundamental understanding of future work, and potential improvements to work, workplaces, workforce preparation, or work outcomes for workers and society. It must be convergent research that addresses the technological as well as the human and societal dimensions and potential impact of future work, and in doing so, make significant contributions to both intellectual merit and broader impact. Achieving this goal requires integration and convergence of disciplines across computer science, engineering, learning sciences, research on education and workforce training, and social, behavioral, and economic sciences.

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